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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
on foreign policy you're seeing a robust left presence. i want to go back. i think the more interesting thing here is the new coalitions forming. when you see code pink and freedom work joining together for a rally. >> that means the world is over. >> that means america has to is the up and take notice we're doing something really troubling. hopefully the president will show leadership and take accountability for it. >> in a weird way not everything has to be partisan. >> lets not go too crazy. >> not get ahead of ourselves. waiting for president obama to speak at the welcoming ceremony for new fbi director james comey. >>> former vice president dick cheney cast in a new light. we will discuss cheney doctrine and peter baker's incredibly awesome new book next on "now." ready to run your lines? okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ]
and all the indian country to fully incorporate the standards into foreign policy. >> i have a second part dealing with the global policy. with the united nations declaration is that a factor in the role of the united states diplomacy with global humanitarian issues? >> yes. i think it is very important because foreign policy is based on human rights as president eisenhower said up -- whatever america once in the world the past to take place in its own backyard. it is important we want to use human rights as a foreign policy tool to take care of this legacy of conquest here at home. i am from oklahoma they don't like the u.n. or international law but as long as we are a member nation of the united nations to promote human rights in always running to the un whenever we tried to do humanitarian int to do humanitarian intervention or a call or punishment with the war against syria we go to you when we are still a member in this declaration they expect them to pay heed that is a new order of the day and ultimately our nation will extend the human-rights just like the world has abolished slaver
? the russians deny the italian media report. joining us for more on benghazi and other foreign policy challenges facing the nation, general jack keen, retired four-star army general, former army vice chief of staff, fox news military analyst. general, great to have you with us. >> good to be here. >> this is, as i say, sordid politics, but it masks a real issue. and that is the ability of congress to participate in the governance of the country. what's your reaction to the administration position that a criminal investigation by the fbi about what is obviously an attack on the country which generally falls within the purview of intelligence agencies and the military would be the reason to block efforts to understand better what transpired? >> yeah, it makes no sense, lou. and i'm sure you have the same instincts. we should be able to conduct a congressional investigation, the representatives of the people, to find out what happened when a consulate was burned to the ground, an babassador was killd and the cia was driven out of the country. that is serious business. they do not have to have an o
supporting our foreign policy and national security objectives that we are more effectively weighing the risks and rewards of our activities that we are focused above all on threats to the american people. we need to ensure are collecting information not just because we can but because we should. because we need it for our security. so again, i won't go on too long. i think it's important top context you'llize some of these revelations to look at what the administration is doing to review our intelligence activities and to look at how we balance the need for security in this completely transformed world that we live in because of the technology advances that have occurred. and then against, as i said earlier, the clear and real privacy concerns that americans and people around the world share. >> you just mentioned that it's important for us to make sure that our intelligence gathering above all is about protecting american security and you and the president in the past have talked about the nsa really being focused on things like terrorism, proliferation of wmds. can au sure our all
.s. can reconcile the democracy in egypt. >> it comes down to two facts about u.s. foreign policy in the middle east. >> one the u.s. is committed to maintaining the peace treaty between egypt and israel and it can simply not end a relationship with egypt in order to maintain that peace treaty. that is where you see the material or the military parts that are still being given to the military to help preserve the security in the sinai peninsula, for example. there is also the matter of trying to enhance the u.s.' stature across the middle east. it would not due for the obama administration to cut off all ties with the country with who it's had a long standing political and military relationship because of these political problems. >> with that said one. points secon secretary kerry isg while he is in cairo, this interm government cannot exist in perpetuity. it needs to get on with the business of constitutional reforms and establishing elections for a new democratically elected president and parliament. and it need to take on has to steps much soonerrather than later. >> let's tal
an impact on u.s. foreign policy, on the way it talks and discusses and not only that, collects information, and it's also having an impact in the fact that, you know, lots of people in europe, especially leaders, are not cutting the u.s. as much slack as they might have done in the past. partly, they're saying, because the u.s. under the obama administration, is backing off a lot of the burden sharing, a lot of the heavy lifting that traditionally the u.s. has done in support of its allies over the past. >> because of the fallout, bought of the anger amongst the world leaders, julian, do you think someone's head should roll over this? >> well, we're going to see what the administration does. i think two things to remember. president obama himself raised a lot of the expectations about the differences with how he would conduct national security operations and those resonated both here and around the world. so it might be that in the end, he tries to blame someone. he himself now by -- with this report coming out that he ordered this to stop, it's something of an admission this shouldn't be
and other foreign policy challenges facing the nation, general jack keen, retired four-star army general, former army vice chief of staff, fox news military analyst. general, great to have you with us. >> good to be here. >> this is, as i say, sordid politics, but it masks a real issue. and that is the ability of congress to participate in the governance of the country. what's your reaction to the administration position that a criminal investigation by the fbi about what is obviously an attack on the country which generally falls within the purview of intelligence agencies and the military would be the reason to block efforts to understand better what transpired? >> yeah, it makes no sense, lou. and i'm sure you have the same instincts. we should be able to conduct a congressional investigation, the representatives of the people, to find out what happened when a consulate was burned to the ground, an am babassador was kid and the cia was driven out of the country. that is serious business. they do not have to have an open hearing. they can do a closed-door hearing to get at with the wit
. lou: always good to talk with you. come back soon. much more on the president's foreign policy and its failures with the "a-team" next. stay with us. who is responsible for the obamacare mess? should obamacare be fixed or just scrub? for health and human services secretary michael leavitt joins us next. ♪ as a business owner, i'm constantly putting out fires. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on ery purchase, every day. i break my back around here. finally soone's recognizing me with unlimited rewards! meetings start at 11, cindy. [ male announcer get the spark business card from capital one. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every d. what's in your wallet? i need your timesheets, larry! what's in your wallet? at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. lou: an explosiv
. lou: always good to talk with you. come bac soon. much more on the president's foreign policy and its failures with the "a-team" next. stay with us. who is responsible for the obamacare mess? should obamacare be fixed or just scrub? for health and human services secretary michael leavitt joins us next. ♪ lou: an explosive new book entitled double down focusing on potential 2016 candidates and according to authors, mitt romney's decided he could not choose new dirt -- new jersey's governor as running mate because his background was littered with land mines. allegedly had unanswered questions concerning a defamation lawsuit, his medical history, and this time as a securities industry lobbyist. another major revelation in the book, the president's top aides secretly considering replacing vice president biden on the 2012 ticket with then secretary of state hillary clinton. the last time the federal government delivered a new health care benefit to more than 40 billion people, our next guest was in charge, health and human services secretary when the bush administration unveiled medicare
strategy in the iranian foreign policy. the essential question is did sanctions work? >> it's difficult to come up with an explanation as to why it is in the presidential elections six of the seven candidates criticized the previous negotiator. unless there was some impact sanctions were having on the debate in iran. it's difficult to see why it is his focus on the economy would have been so successful unless the sanctions were having some impact in iran's economy. it's difficult to see why it is that after several years which iran seemed entirely uninterested in a nuclear deal we have a new nuclear negotiating team that is obviously interested in reaching a deal as quickly as possible. unless the sanctions were having some impact on iran. and i think one of the people whose opinion we should listen to in the matter is mr. -- who said repeatedly the sanction we're having a dramatic impact on iran. and it change and approach was necessary. so from the perspective of the obama administration, -- as i have written several monograph. the obama team from the beginning always thought the sanc
point out, nsa situation obviously a huge domestic and foreign policy issue, health care is his signature achievement to this point in his presidency. you would think he would be more in the loop is a way of saying it than he has been. >> how much of this shock that's being expressed by the allies just simply to try to get some leverage with the u.s. because everyone knew this was going on and they do it to us and we do it to them. the world of spying. >> you have to express anger this is going on. if you suspected or knew it was going on. they can use it effectively for leverage. the question now is whether or not united states is going to enter into new nonspying agreements with countries they have long resisted entering these agreements with. so whether it's the french or germans, you know, they now have a good deal of leverage to try to negotiate these pacts if they so choose. it's quite possible one result is there will be more nonspying agreements with european allies than there were before. >> i would bet on germany and not on france, just saying. mark mazzetti and chris
million of us are being spied on as well as the rest of the world. if you want to talk about foreign-policy, i have the democrats and republicans, it is not good. we need to take a step back, look at what we're doing and then make wise choices. thanks. chris from california is next. chris on our independent line. think this nsa program has been way out of line since it began during the bush administration where the american people find out about it. president in our past history called nixon who is spying on a hotel and he was forced to resign. whether obama knew about this or not, he supposed to know this and if he did not know he should resign for lack of ability to do his job heard this is insane what we're doing. we are spying on every human being possible am a friend, foe, everything. example that we are sending to children. do think we can rebuild trust in this issue? inler: i think the trust this country has been down the tubes for the last 15 or 20 years. you can show many examples of that. thes not just the nsa, now tpp has been going on for years now. nobody in this country knows
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct of foreign policy, to the fed's matters, to economic matters and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence, james clapper announced overnight he's declassifying a trove of documents about collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance act or fisa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexander will be testifying on the hill. kate, we can expect them to face hard questions as well. we'll try to ask some of our own. >> absolutely. review on multiple fronts but what will come of it? jim sciutto, great to see you. thank you so much. >>> the obama administration is facing ongoing criticism on another front. obama care. the president'sed visors are fighting back on twitter, challenging claims millions of people could lose coverage because of the law. the administration is extending the signup window by six weeks. senior white house correspondent brianna keilar is here with the very latest. >> that signup deadline now march 31st. it had been februa
, there are real risks of disclosure. so it's kind of the classic foreign policy dilemma that you have very modest tactical benefits and a huge strategic risk. that has now blown up in our faces. >> bill? >> i would say if you're going to eavesdrop on phone calls of the german chancellor, that has to be something that the president of the united states authorizes and thinks frankly is worth the risk of exposure, as nick says. you can't just have the bureaucracy doing that. i would like to know, did this president or the previous president, for that matter, sanction that and if so, maybe they thought it was worth it. i don't have a principled problem with listening to other people's calls, even some allies, if we think it's important. you shouldn't do it in a haphazard way which generally damages relations with the real ally. >> do you think it's true that the president of the united states would not know that the nsa is listening in to angela merkel's phone conversations? >> you know, i'm a little mystified by that. i talked today to a former senior cia official and asked about that, and this pers
comment on our foreign policy by former vice president dick cheney. listen to this. >> i think our friend no longer count on us, no longer trust us and our adversaries don't fear us. that is the cornerstone and base of u.s. ability and influence. if we're not heavily involved there, if we turned our back on the region, if we have a president who believes we overreacted to the terrorism attacks on 9/11, i think the saudis, the emiratis, egyptians, many in that part of the world no longer have confidence in the united states. martha: does this president lack confidence or even respect to some extent from some of these world leaders and is that part of the reason that we're seeing this kind of outrage about all this? >> by all accounts president obama does not have close personal relationships with foreign leaders the way reagan did with thatcher or bill clinton did with tony blair or president bush with angela merkel for that matter or with sarkozy. in the middle east he had very inconsistent policy for instance with syria. he basically told france by all accounts that we were going to atta
by chemical weapons, the obama administration was caught on its heels in a foreign policy quandary. america was reminded again that the united states must always be vigilant and embrace an international relations framework which enables proactive engagement rather than merely reactionary crisis response. mr. speaker, i desperately hope that these discussions will proceed in the context of the grave reality the human family will face if nuclear weapons fall into the handles of jihadists in iran. to use the slight hely altered words of our secretary of state, mr. speaker, quote, in a world of terrorists and extremists, we ignore these risks at our peril. we simply cannot afford to have nuclear weapons become the i.e.d. or car bomb of tomorrow. neither our country nor our conscience can bear the costs of inaction. mr. speaker, the u.s.-iran nuclear negotiations act is, quote, an action that will reinforce the prohibition against nuclear weapons development. we're talking about actions that will degrade iran's capacity to use these weapons and ensure that they do not proliferate. with this aut
is my question. sooner?'t we do it in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able to issue them. if i may continue,
it sooner? in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? now we find ourselves in a situation this thing you talk about doing, weighing in on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance may be impossible. >> senator, syrian opposition itself from the beginning was very atomized. that's how it survived. it didn't have clear leaders. it was a bunch of different neighborhoods. there was no national leadership. it's very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you're right. we only recognized it in december 2012. that's true. it was only formed in mid november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. i don't think we delayed -- we have reduced the syrian embassy here, senator, to a visa officer. frankly, that visa officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want syrian passports and he's able to issue them
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct, our foreign policy, to defense matters, to economic matters, and i am a strong supporter of it. >> the director of national intelligence james clapper announced overnight he is declassifying a trove of documents about the collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance acts, or first ssa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexen direction will be testify on the hill about that program. you can be sure they're going to be getting questions about spying overseas, how far it should go and what limits the administration is considering placing on it now. >> this is a huge story, especially in europe. jim sciutto, thank you very much. >>> republican senator lindsey graham turning up the heat on the obama administration for its handling of last year's benghazi rror attack and its aftermath. the outspoken critic of the administration is threatening to block all presidential nomination, before the senate until survivors of that attack testify before congress. take a listen to graham on f
, the difference is the president was awful lucky we had an affordable care act all week because of the foreign policy and here israel dropping bombs in syria on missiles that were sort of underreported was to me a pretty big deal. i mean, we have that problem that's still there. we have the middle east and an i iranian problem and did drop off the screen. i thought that was very important. >> what about obama care? you were telling us earlier repeal and replace with what, right? >> it is not just repeal and replace and go back to vermont. i don't agree with anything but they're doing something different and republicans have to get into exactly what they think it's resetting obama care, redoing it. that's still for another day. >> thank you so much. christine, kayton, david, all thank you so much. thank you for watching. i'm richard lui. i'll see you tomorrow right back here at 3:00 p.m. eastern time but first "disrupt with karen finney." [ male announcer ] this is claira. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for her, she's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll
the domain of foreign policy, whether the central government is on board because the prime minister of pakistan is going to be briefed by his cabinet in the next few hours and is going to be some sort of outcome from that particular meeting with the prime minister later tonight. >> we will continue to follow that, and thank you. elections turn violent sunday in parts of kosovo and masked men burst in throwing tear gas and smashing ballot boxes and the police were across the city and the first time they are voting in local elections since they declared independence in 2008. when the storm season calms and dangerous exit begins and 50 people are missing after a boat capsized and eight people were rescued and carrying muslims and they are a muslim minority in myanmar and persecuted and 200 people have been killed in violence and hundreds in camps and they tried to flee the country. east of the bay another boat accident killed at least six tourists, a boat capsized and it was over crowded and took on water and sank. the capacity is 150 but there have been more than 200 on board. witness
in charge, the foreign policy guy he's the chief executive of the united states government responsible for the irs and all the agencies under him. maybe you consider that conceptual but it's real an every time something gets screwed up out there there's a sense he may not be involved. that's not way it ought to be. we only get one guy in there and that's the chief executive and he ought to be accountable. >> chris matthews thank you so much. we'll see you tonight at 7:00 on "hardball." julie pace thank you as well. i hope you put up with me. chuck and michael steele stay with us if you can. up next superstorm sandy one year later. we revisit one of the hardest hit areas. plus senator chuck schumer on what's still need in the recovery efforts. in the coming addition joe will be taking part in a series of events to mark the upcoming publication of his brand new book "the right path." it's the right time for this book. it scares me, actually. things kick off on monday november 11th at columbia university the miller theater there. he'll sit down with jon meacham. you can get free admissio
've abandoned them, as we have done egypt. it's an interesting foreign policy we're witnessing. lieutenant colonel allen west who fights for us, worked for us in washington and now a fox news contributor, thanks so much. >> thanks for having me, brian. >> next up, hey, parents, do your kids love mac and cheese? there is big changes coming and you need to know about it because they're going to eat it anyway. reality show husband bill rancic is running into the studio right now, he'll be in last place of the new york city marathon. wisest kid? we need a new recipe. let us consult the scroll of infinite deliciousness. perfect. [ wisest kid ] campbell's has the recipes kids love. so good! [ wisest kid ] at campbellskitchen.com. [ gong ] m'm! m'm! good! female narrator: the mattress price wars are ending soon the mattress price wars are ending soon at sleep train. we've challenged the manufacturers to offer even lower prices. now it's posturepedic versus beautyrest with big savings of up to $400 off. serta icomfort and tempur-pedic go head-to-head with three years' interest-free financing, plus
an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the united states. therefore i have determined that it is necessary to continue the national emergency declared with respect to sudan and maintain and enforce the sanctions against sudan to respond to this threat. signed, barack obama, the white house, october 30, 2013. the speaker pro tempore: the message will be referred to the committee on foreign affairs and ordered printed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. gohmert: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today, it adjourn to meet at 10:00 a.m. on friday, november 1, 2013, unless it has received a message from the senate transmitting its concurrence in the house concurrent resolution 62, in which case the house shall stand adjourned pursuant to that concurrent resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. gohmert: pursuant to the order of the house today, mr. speaker, i move that the house do now hereby adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjo
intelligence or suspected foreign agents. >> one major point was made to surveillance policies, saying everybody else is doing it too. they claim some of the information came from nato allies, not u.s. spying. greece has admitted to spying on the u.s. and others in the 1990's at the hearing. james clapper made it clear the u.s. is in good company. >> you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> he said the white house was aware the n.s.a. oversees eavesdropping all along, but may not have known specifics. >> russian leaders denying reports of spying on overseas leaders. they are accused of passing out bugged gift bags at last months g-20 summit. the report by two italian newspapers say delegates were given memory sticks and phone chargers equipped with spyware. it's unclear how many leaders received the bags or used the free bees. >> edward snowden can earn a ticket out of russia if he testifies about spying. germany are investigating report
? >> with foreign leaders i care about our foreign leaders who are our allies, are they talking to my enemies, i want hear it. are they talking to each other about what they're going to tell us or what their policy positions are going to be. i want to hear that. is angela merkel using that fine talking to her intelligence phone deciding what they will and won't share with us? >> haven't we gotten enough information to justify the intrusion? is it the right question, and what is the answer? >> absolutely a fair question and chris, i think this whole debate has changed in a post-9/11 world where we have all this new capability. we are able to do surveillance. there are oversight mechanisms in place, but i think it's time for us to have a public debate about has our government made the balance right. we have members of congress who implement laws who enact laws and if americans don't like it, they need to engage with their congressperson and talk about how should the balance between privacy and civil liberties versus our national security be made. >> i get the sensitivities about american citizenry
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)